Celebrities are not politicians

opinion-editoral-graphic-01

Eminem has it all figured out. Or so he thinks.

The famous rapper recently performed a freestyle rap, called “The Storm,” at the 2017 BET Hip Hop Awards, which contained a slew of criticisms and profanities aimed at President Donald Trump.

Eminem is not the first celebrity to publicly state his political opinions. Over the years, celebrities have used their status to influence the opinions of the American people. Even our current president dabbled in the celebrity world by hosting the reality show “The Apprentice” for 12 years and making cameos in 12 films.

In 2016, during the Republican and Democratic National Conventions, celebrities presented at both events to show their favor for either candidate and their distaste for the other. Scott Baio, former star of “Happy Days,” and Antonio Sabato, Jr. of “General Hospital” both spoke at the Republican National Convention, while Boyz II Men and Katy Perry spoke at the Democratic National Convention.

According to CNN, Sabato filed documents with the Federal Election Commission and plans to run for Congress in California in 2018. However, this is not a new trend. Celebrities have been dipping their toes into politics since 1965, starting with actor George Murphy, who left the Hollywood scene to become a U.S. Senator.

While I am impressed with these celebrities’ interest in politics — which sends a good message to individuals to keep up with government actions — I am frustrated at the amount of blind trust we put into these figures when most of them have never gone to college or studied politics.

What reason do we have to believe Eminem knows  more than we do about how one should govern our country? Is it his education, his experience, his wisdom? Show me his credentials. The truth is: Eminem dropped out of high school when he was 17-years-old and never looked back.

A former classmate of mine recently posted Eminem’s performance on Facebook. Someone commented, “Why would I care what this guy thinks?” His response made me laugh: “Best rapper alive.”

Good answer.

When did this become a good reason for us to trust someone else’s judgement? When did we decide our opinions should rely on those of the majority or on those who have written a few songs or starred in a few movies? When did we start to conform? To choose someone else’s opinion over forming our own?

Celebrities should not be the reason we believe what we do. Facts, morals and at the very least, people who know what they are talking about should guide us to what we trust in. We should not be taking the “easy” route by just choosing a side based on who else supports it.

We need to learn some independence and courage. Independence from the opinions of others and courage to be different. To stand up for what you — no one else — believe in despite everyone else. Pay attention to the facts and make your decisions based on facts you have found and what you feel in your heart.

Email this to someonePrint this pageShare on Facebook0Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn0

Leave a Reply