Preemptive action for North Korea

North Korea is spewing a new string of threats aimed at the United States. Theguardian.com noted that North Korea is threatening to aim nuclear weapons at American bases in the Pacific. With all the threats North Korea has been making and with national security in mind, I am proposing that America will have to change its mindset from one of reaction to preemptive action.

The “preemptive action” I am proposing is not mindless killing with an individual who acts as judge and jury. Instead, I am proposing a system of individuals who take into consideration a list of people who are a threat to the American way of life.

Keep in mind the actions America took to kill the former leader of al-Qaeda, Osama bin Laden. Simply put, America took action and flew into Pakistan, killing bin Laden. If America had asked permission from Pakistan, the years of searching for Osama bin Laden might have been in vain.

Preemptive action could save thousands of lives, millions of dollars and keep America from entering another war. Two important considerations for America before taking preemptive action are the repercussions the action may have and the regulations upon who makes the decisions of preemptive action.

A good example of bad repercussions stemming from preemptive action would be the actions taken by America and Britain in the 1953 Iranian coup d’etat. The overthrow was initiated in large part to control the oil, but by trying to control the government, America not only made future relations with the Iranian government difficult, but also made other rich, influential individuals such as bin Laden upset.

It sounds silly that America made one individual upset and now an entire country needs to be afraid, but Osama bin Laden was the embodiment of the reason America needs to be cautious, especially in this age of technology and travel. The reason America must be cautious of our actions is that people with crazy ideas and money will nearly always be able to influence others with less money or education.

For now, the threats from North Korea are not worrying officials. As CBSnews.com was told by a senior U.S. official Major Garrett, the rhetoric for now is just that – all talk. The time may come soon to take action without war.

If the government is able to obtain information and proof that a certain individual is planning an attack and has started to put their plans into action, the country should be able to take action.

I support special operations because the people caught in the middle of a conflict don’t deserve what the leader does.  The entire North Korean population should not be subjected to a war or bombings; instead, we could send in a small taskforce to remove a dictator who may possibly try to launch nuclear weapons.

The standard and definition of who would be placed on the ‘hit list’ would be difficult to define but would make it easier to discriminate between threats and nuisances. Hugo Chavez may have made threats, hated America and made some bad decisions for the people of his country, but that doesn’t mean that America would go in and remove him from power.

Kim Jong-un may not have reached the level yet to be taken from power, and one man with ideals that are different from mine should not require the full attention of the U.S., but his threats are no longer pathetic. With nuclear weapons available and an individual who may have a crazed notion that all of his problems stem from America, it is a situation that requires only that he make a plan and implement it.

People may not see this process as ethical, but until people can accept that a program such as this is used, innocent people will continue to be the ones to lose their lives.

There are many other considerations that would have to be worked out, and a program such as this would not be a simple thing to start. The first step is to discuss and work on a solution. The world will always have crazy people who want to kill, but there is a possibility a program such as this could limit the civilian casualties and cause less strife.

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